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Monday, December 22, 2014

Sports Participation Trends for 1999

Posted by William on August 31, 2012

The Sporting Goods Manufacturers Association (SGMA) released its most recent Superstudy of Sports Participation, which was conducted by American Sports Data. Of the 30 most popular sports in the U.S., recreational swimming ranks No. 1, with 95.1 million participants, recreational walking is No. 2, with 84.1 million participants, and recreational biking comes in third, with 56.2 million participants. All of the top three had an increase in participation from 1998. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Total Fitness for Surfing, Part 6

Posted by William on

Laying supine on a bench with the pulley above and behind your head will result in the greatest degree of difficulty being experienced as the handle approaches the end of the range of motion. This is where the arms would be just before leaving the water when paddling. The resistance in this variation would begin in the position just below the mid-point between the pulley and the shoulders. You may not be able to pull the bar all the way down, unless a length of chain is attached by carabiners to the handle on one end and the cable on the other end. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Total Fitness for Surfing, Part 5

Posted by William on

One example of what not to do that is seen in gyms is people who stand up and push a barbell or dumbbells forward from the shoulders and back to the start. These people are under the mistaken impression that the Pectoralis muscles (chest) are being used while the body is standing erect, as in some sports, such as football. Unfortunately, the muscles being used are the anterior deltoids, since the direction of motion is horizontal, while direction of resistance is straight down. The Pectoral muscles are only used when bringing the upper arms closer together in front of the chest directly against resistance. In addition, some people may find this movement irritates the lateral epicondyles at the outside of the elbows. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Total Fitness for Surfing, Part 4

Posted by William on

The degree to which each training protocol is used depends on which area the surfer wishes to improve the most. The entire body is used in surfing to some extent, so use a program that develops all the major muscles of the body and their stabilizing muscles. Train both sides of a joint equally, unless there is a marked imbalance in strength or development or a postural imbalance. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Total Fitness for Surfing, Part 3

Posted by William on

Flexibility Training

Flexibility is often an unappreciated aspect of sports performance. Insufficient flexibility increases the risk of injury in a wipeout or a collision with another surfer. In addition, it can distort the paddling stroke and reduce the ability to do bottom turns or cutbacks without strain. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Total Fitness for Surfing, Part 2

Posted by William on

If you go to another break that has surf that is more consistent and/or a longer paddle to reach the surf zone, you will not have sufficient endurance to ride there unless you have done other conditioning to prepare. The same will occur during a large swell at your home break, or if a change in the sandbar conditions cause the waves to break farther out from shore. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Total Fitness for Surfing, Part 1

Posted by William on

At first glance, many surfers and surfing fans may think this article is superfluous, that surfing itself gives complete fitness. However, an examination of the components of surfing performance shows many aspects of fitness are required, but not all of these are efficiently developed by only surfing. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

The Female Athlete Triad, Part 2

Posted by William on May 24, 2012

How is The Female Athlete Triad Diagnosed?
There is no single test to diagnose the Female Athlete Triad. Instead, the diagnosis rests on uncovering the different features of the triad.

The signs and symptoms may be subtle at first. Initially, athletes may not consciously over-exercise or restrict their calories. Eventually they may start to perform disordered eating behaviors, often in secret, and intensify their physical training. With time, their periods may cease and any of the multiple signs and symptoms of disordered eating may set in, such as fatigue. Stress fractures may occur. WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

The Female Athlete Triad, Part 1

Posted by William on

What’s that? You’re a female athlete and you’ve never heard of the female athlete triad? You didn’t know that excessive training and exercise can lead to serious health problems like disordered eating, not getting your periods, and thinning bones? WAIT! There is more to read… read on »

Is This Tennis Elbow

Posted by William on July 6, 2011

Q.For the last few weeks I have had a sharp pain in my left elbow. It hurts to lift things, and when I press on the elbow it also hurts. Could this be tennis elbow? What else might it be? And what should I do about it? WAIT! There is more to read… read on »